Find The Best Ohio Catfish Fishing

December 7th, 2009 | by admin |

When determining where you should spend your days angling during the warm summer months of June and July, Ohio catfish fishing can provide an excellent catch and a great time for all. In Ohio, catfish fishing is best in the rivers, so get ready for a list of the top fishing rivers in the state.

Starting in District Two, you’ll find great catfishing opportunities in the Maumee River, thanks to the channel and flathead catfish that are readily found upstream from Toledo, where it cuts through a wide flood plain. You’ll find lots of channel cats that range around 16 inches in length and shouldn’t be surprised to reel in an average flathead that ranges from 20 to 40 inches. The rock bed river is extremely shallow, so check in the deep holes that run more than six feet deep for the best catch.

In the Huron River, Ohio catfish fishing continues to produce a number of channel cats and flatheads. Here, you’ll find holes a bit deeper than at the Maumee, and your catch will be about the same size. Don’t exclude the Auglaize River, either, a tributary of the Maumee in Northwest Ohio. Catfish fishing provides an abundance of big fish here in the summertime, with less bedrock and holes that dip down more than ten feet. While the river isn’t navigable at all in the summer in its upper section, you’ll find great shoreline fishing and plenty of channel cats in the pools in the lower area.

District Three also boasts several fine catfish rivers. Start with the tailwaters branching off the Tappan Lake, which are actually what’s left of the Little Stillwater Creek. The dam provides a great holding and breeding ground for catfish, and you will want to target area pools that range about eight to twelve feet in depths. You can expect to find a lot of flatheads and a smaller supply of channel cats here. Also check out the small rivers and streams that are tailwaters of Clendening Lake, also producing a flathead roundup that can range as large as 60 pounds and a few channel cats along the way. As long as you are in the area, check out the Atwood Lake tailwaters in Carroll or Tuscarawas County, where deeper pools have been created by unexpectedly high flows. Also pay attention to the surrounding flats at night.

Ohio catfish fishing continues to be productive in District Four, where the Muskingum River is a favorite for anglers looking for both channel cats and flatheads. There are six excellent pools on the river, including the Marietta Pool, Devola Pool, and Beverly Pool, all of which produce a fine catch for avid anglers, especially during the summer. Also be sure to check out Zanesville Pool in the Ellis Tailwaters, which flows for just over nine miles and offers great flathead fishing.

Daniel Eggertsen
http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-and-fitness-articles/find-the-best-ohio-catfish-fishing-114180.html

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  1. 7 Responses to “Find The Best Ohio Catfish Fishing”

  2. By Curt C on Jan 7, 2010 | Reply

    What type of gear is best for catching large catfish near Pittsburgh PA?
    The allegheny, ohio, and monongahela rivers are well known for big flathead and channel catfish. The fish are there, but it doesn’t seem information about what type of rod/reel, bait, or line/knots are available anywhere.

  3. By DesignR on Jan 7, 2010 | Reply

    a piece of sponge with wd40 on it – seriously!
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  4. By more than a hat rack on Jan 7, 2010 | Reply

    Most catfish gear is basic and not too expensive… i live on the Mississippi River and most river systems are simple…

    get about a 7 ft. rod (one piece heavy action). if you have heavy current and need a big weight, then you’ll need a bigger rod. ugly stick by shakespeare have some rods that are priced well. i also have a 10ft rod for the large weights and bank fishing.
    get some circle hooks. i think eagle claw has some inexpensive ones. get about 5/0 to start with.
    get some lead weights at the local takle shot. probably 2oz. up to 16oz. depending on current. i’ve actually use the 16oz. in heavy current in some deep holes to keep the bait in place.
    get some strong line, about 50lb test for the main line. tie about 20lb test on as a leader, so the hook or sinker will break off if you get hung up. 50lb is tough to break, so use a lighter leader.
    oh, get some brass swivels to tie the main line to the sinker and hook. the faster the current, the shorter the leader. 1-3ft.

    catfish insider is a good magazine. good luck and good fishing.
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  5. By johnny j on Jan 7, 2010 | Reply

    Use a saltwater type heavy duty bait cast outfit, such as a Penn or Daiwa, gear ratio of at least 4.6.1,with a 7.5- 8ft. graphite rod. Use a 20-30 pound line with a large 1 oz barrel sinker, with a split shot above the hook about 3 inches, allowing some leeway for the live bait fish. Use a size 4 Eagleclaw hook and a live 6-8 inch sucker or other bait fish. Fish at night if at all possible, when the big-uns are out feeding. Some have luck with blood bait, but bothered with small ones using the stink-type baits.
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  6. By ERIC D on Jan 7, 2010 | Reply

    OK WELL U SHUD START WITH A SPINNIG REEL ABOT 6′0 ROD AND FOR BAIT DEFINATLEY USE EITHER CUT BLUE GILL OR YOU CAN ALSO USE CUT SQUID IVE LEARNED THAT CATFISH WILL BITE ON ALMOST ANY CUT BAIT FOR LINE USE FIRELINE 20 POUND TEST. BASICALLY HAVE FUN AND CATCH FISH THATS WAT MATTERS MOST
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  7. By chris45771618 on Jan 7, 2010 | Reply

    I’m on the Mississippi here. And when I go out for the big cats, I take my Muskie rod, A 5′6" Gander Mountain Heavy action, Abu-Garcia 6500 c-3 real. I still have a couple thousand yards of Berkly ULTRA-MAX 25/60 braided nylon line. Never lost a BIG fish with that outfit.
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    several 20-30 lb fish and a 45 lb snapper

  8. By PAFC on Jan 7, 2010 | Reply

    I’ve been fishing for catfish in the Allegheny for 2 years, and I go every day because I live next to the river, and I only have caught 5. They were big though. I use chicken liver.
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